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Post Tram Flap Complications

Post Tram Flap Complications

Postby anod » Sat Aug 12, 2000 4:04 pm

I would like to know if anyone has experienced continuous pain in either side of their abdomen after having Tram Flap surgery. I had both breasts reconstructed in April 1999 and still experience pain in my right side daily. I am now going to a Pain Management dr who doesn't have a clue as to what is happening. Can anyone help?
anod
 

Post Tram Flap Complications

Postby catlover » Sat Aug 12, 2000 4:48 pm

Dear Anod -- I am sorry you are in pain.

I had a bilateral tram free flap in Aug. 1998.

Please clarify some things. Was it a "free" or "pedicled"(tunneled) flap? (I was leary of pedicled thinking it might cause the type of discomfort you are experiencing.) Is the pain in the right side of your abdominal area or is it actually your side? Can you describe the pain? Have you asked your surgeon what it could be?

As far as pain, I don't have the kind of pain that would send me to a pain mgmt clinic, but it does feel raw and icky there ... I'm wondering if and when it will ever feel normal again. I know if I tried to do crunches it would hurt.

Now ... come to think of it, I have developed a troubling chronic pain and stiffness in my right hip-back area, which I never thought was related to the abdominal surgery. My oncologist says it's sacroileitis ... my osteopath says it's arthritis or fibromyalgia.

I have a question for you too ... does your tummy bulge more on one side than the other? My surgeon is very quiet on this ... I know he's puzzled.
catlover
 

Post Tram Flap Complications

Postby Martha » Sun Aug 13, 2000 1:04 am

I'm sorry to ask such a basic question as I'm am new to breast cancer. What is a "tram flap" procedure?

Thanks, Martha
Martha
 

Post Tram Flap Complications

Postby catlover » Sun Aug 13, 2000 8:20 am

Martha -- Briefly, it is a reconstruction option using your own tissue (as opposed to implants).

TRAM stands for Trans Rectus Abdominus Muscle. They cut some muscle fat and skin from this area and use it to sculpt a new breast. Pretty wild isn't it. There is much to say about it ... you can search on this site in Search or go to Topics, or there's lots of info, even some with photos, on other sites.

Feel free to discuss again, and God bless, and be well.
catlover
 

Post Tram Flap Complications

Postby Martha » Sun Aug 13, 2000 11:02 pm

Catlover. Thank you for the summary! I will do some additional research here to learn more.

God bless.
Martha
 

Post Tram Flap Complications

Postby David » Fri Aug 18, 2000 9:01 am

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by anod:
I would like to know if anyone has experienced continuous pain in either side of their abdomen after having Tram Flap surgery. I had both breasts reconstructed in April 1999 and still experience pain in my right side daily. I am now going to a Pain Management dr who doesn't have a clue as to what is happening. Can anyone help?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Dear Anod,
I am sorry to hear that you are having continued pain so long after your TRAM.

Let me suggest that you talk to you doctor(s) about trying massage therapy. More doctors are recommendating this type of therpy for a variety of conditions.

Some of my background. I am a massage therapist and got into it later in life (at 54) at my wife's suggestion (she is an RN). I am certified in Breast Cancer and Mastectomy Massage and other Breast Surgeries through the Susan G Komen Foundation.

I have several doctors as clients and many referrals from them, and other doctors, for wormen who have breast cancer surgery.

I have been fortunite to have had the privledge to be in several operating rooms watching different types of surgeries. This has given me a better understanding of what goes on during surgery and what the affects are afterwards.

After an operation, of any kind, when the body heals itself it builds up scar tissue around the incision. The scar tissue is hard and causes, in some cases, severe pain, espically when moving, bending over, etc. You notice the scar tissue on the outside but there is also scar tissue on the inside.

I have a lot of doctors refer clients who have had breast surgery to help eliminate the internal scar tissue, eliminate about 80% of the external scar tissue, bringing back some of the feeling that was lost during surgery, get the circulation to the area again, and get the lymph flowing. The same holds true for C-sections and Historectomies.

Your discomfit could be just the buildup of scar tissue inside your abdomen and/or the discomfit of the mesh material the doctor might have used to help hold your internals together while they heal.

First, I would talk to your doctor about the prospect of the discomfort being caused by scar tissue, his/her using and mesh, and what he/she thinks about massage to reduce the discomfort. At this point in time (1 yr. later) a doctor's recommendation is not needed, but I strongly recommend you talk it over with your doctor first.

All of my clients who how have breast surgery, or other types of sergury, are very pleased with my massage in reducing scar tissue and increasing the feeling in the area.

If you do try massage make sure you go to a massage therapist that you are comfortable with. Talk with him/her first. You must be comfortable with the massage therapists' answers. Talk with several therapists first. Make sure they are Licensed in your state, Nationally Certified in Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork, belong to the AMTA (American Massage Therapy Association), and are Certified in Breast Cancer and Mastectomy Massage.

If you are interested let me know and I will help you find someone in your area.



[This message has been edited by David (edited August 18, 2000).]
David
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Aug 18, 2000 12:01 am
Location: Bloomfield, Connecticut

Post Tram Flap Complications

Postby chelseababe » Thu Oct 05, 2000 7:53 pm

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by David:
Dear Anod,
I am sorry to hear that you are having continued pain so long after your TRAM.

Let me suggest that you talk to you doctor(s) about trying massage therapy. More doctors are recommendating this type of therpy for a variety of conditions.

Some of my background. I am a massage therapist and got into it later in life (at 54) at my wife's suggestion (she is an RN). I am certified in Breast Cancer and Mastectomy Massage and other Breast Surgeries through the Susan G Komen Foundation.

I have several doctors as clients and many referrals from them, and other doctors, for wormen who have breast cancer surgery.

I have been fortunite to have had the privledge to be in several operating rooms watching different types of surgeries. This has given me a better understanding of what goes on during surgery and what the affects are afterwards.

After an operation, of any kind, when the body heals itself it builds up scar tissue around the incision. The scar tissue is hard and causes, in some cases, severe pain, espically when moving, bending over, etc. You notice the scar tissue on the outside but there is also scar tissue on the inside.

I have a lot of doctors refer clients who have had breast surgery to help eliminate the internal scar tissue, eliminate about 80% of the external scar tissue, bringing back some of the feeling that was lost during surgery, get the circulation to the area again, and get the lymph flowing. The same holds true for C-sections and Historectomies.

Your discomfit could be just the buildup of scar tissue inside your abdomen and/or the discomfit of the mesh material the doctor might have used to help hold your internals together while they heal.

First, I would talk to your doctor about the prospect of the discomfort being caused by scar tissue, his/her using and mesh, and what he/she thinks about massage to reduce the discomfort. At this point in time (1 yr. later) a doctor's recommendation is not needed, but I strongly recommend you talk it over with your doctor first.

All of my clients who how have breast surgery, or other types of sergury, are very pleased with my massage in reducing scar tissue and increasing the feeling in the area.

If you do try massage make sure you go to a massage therapist that you are comfortable with. Talk with him/her first. You must be comfortable with the massage therapists' answers. Talk with several therapists first. Make sure they are Licensed in your state, Nationally Certified in Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork, belong to the AMTA (American Massage Therapy Association), and are Certified in Breast Cancer and Mastectomy Massage.

If you are interested let me know and I will help you find someone in your area.

[This message has been edited by David (edited August 18, 2000).]
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
chelseababe
 

Post Tram Flap Complications

Postby heldav » Sat Oct 14, 2000 3:56 pm

I have been searching the net to see if anyone has had this problem. I also had one breast removed and reconstruction in April. My pain doesn't seem to be as bad as yours, but it is beginning to make me wonder if something is wrong. I began working out at the gym a few weeks ago and I wondered if this has made it worse. I was told by another woman who had reconstruction that she was still having pain after a year! Good luck to you. I am counting my blessings because I went to a funeral today for a man who was diagnosed with cancer at the same time as I was.
heldav
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Oct 14, 2000 12:01 am
Location: nc

Post Tram Flap Complications

Postby Sue BC » Sat May 31, 2008 5:19 pm

I had a pedicle tram in 03. Have been in constant pain since. I have been to Mayo and take Lyrica,Lamictal,cymbalta and ultram. Please tell me if anyone understands this squeezing, burning debilating pain and if there is surgery or a doctor that deals successfully in treating this.
Sue BC
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat May 31, 2008 12:01 am
Location: Rockford, MI USA


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